Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose Tool

How often do I check, and what pattern is right for me? Use this interactive tool to find out how often you need to check your blood sugar, and see some suggested patterns that may be right for you.

Reset

STEP 1: How often do I need to check my blood sugar?

What type of diabetes do you have?

Type 1 diabetes
Type 2 diabetes
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)
Prediabetes

Is your A1C to target (typically ≤7.0%)?

Yes No

What drug(s) do you take for your diabetes?

Insulin
Insulin secretagogue1
Other2
None

1: Examples include: Glicazide (Diamicron®), Glimepiride (Amaryl®), Glyburide (DiaBeta®), Nateglinide (Starlix®), Repaglinide (Gluconorm®)
2: Examples include: Acarbose (Glucobay®), Exenatide (Byetta®), Linagliptin (Trajenta™), Liraglutide (Victoza®), Long Acting Metformin (Glumetza®), Metformin (Glucophage®), Saxagliptin (Onglyza®), Sitagliptin (Januvia®)

Do you use an insulin pump?

Yes No

What drug(s) do you take for your diabetes?

Insulin +/- others
Insulin pump

How often do you use insulin?

Once daily
Twice daily
Four times daily

Which of these insulins do you use?

Premix insulin twice daily
NPH twice daily
Rapid/regular once daily and NPH/long acting once daily
BID split-mix: Rapid/regular with NPH/long acting at breakfast and dinner

Are you sick or have you started taking a steroid medication?

Yes No

Have you been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the past 6 months?

Yes No

Blood Sugar Checking Recommendation:

Check your blood sugar level 4 or more times a day.

STEP 2: Suggested pattern(s)

Please complete step 1
 

Click to Reveal SMBG Pattern Recommendation

Suggested Blood Sugar Pattern(s):

If you use insulin only at bedtime and A1C is to target

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if this pattern is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, if you take insulin once a day, check your sugar at least once per day. Here is an example of a blood sugar checking pattern that may work for you.

Do you need to check at other times of the day? Checking at other times may help you find out if:

  • Your blood sugar is at target throughout the day, or,
  • You have low blood sugar due to other medications that you take by mouth for your diabetes.
  Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you take insulin              
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern              
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Is this blood sugar number above or below your target range? If it is low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you use insulin only at bedtime and A1C is not to target

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if this pattern is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, if you take insulin once a day, check your sugar at least once per day. Here is an example of a blood sugar checking pattern that may work for you.

Do you need to check at other times of the day? Checking at other times may help you find out if:

  • Your blood sugar is at target throughout the day, or,
  • You have low blood sugar due to other medications that you take by mouth for your diabetes.
  Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you take insulin              
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern            
Every other day, switch the times of the day you check your blood sugar            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Is this blood sugar number above or below your target range? If it is low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you typically take insulin before breakfast and before dinner

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see which of these 2 patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new patterns until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, if you take insulin twice a day, check your sugar at least twice per day.

Pattern 1

If you are not meeting your targets, check your blood sugar 4 times a day until you meet your targets. Work with a member of your healthcare team to support you so that you meet your targets.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Not meeting your blood sugar targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
           
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 4 times per day        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

Once you are meeting your targets, check your blood sugar twice a day. Every other day, switch the times of the day you check your blood sugar.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Meeting your blood sugar targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
           
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: twice per day            
Every other day, switch the times of the day you check your blood sugar            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you typically take insulin before one meal (for example before dinner), and before bedtime

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your individual needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see which of these 2 patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new patterns until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, if you take insulin twice a day, check your sugar at least twice per day.

Pattern 1

If you are not meeting your target, or, are starting to take insulin twice per day, check your blood sugar 4 times a day until you meet your target. Work with a member of your diabetes healthcare team to support you so that you meet your target.

  • In this pattern, insulin is taken before dinner, but it could be taken before breakfast or lunch. Usually, pre-meal insulin is taken before the largest meal of the day, or the meal that would have the highest after-meal blood sugar number.
1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Not meeting your blood sugar targets or are starting insulin before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
           
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 4 times per day        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

Once you are meeting your target, check your blood sugar twice a day. Every other day, switch the times of the day you check your blood sugar.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Meeting your blood sugar targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
           
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: twice per day            
Every other day, switch the times of the day you check your blood sugar            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you typically take insulin before breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus, at bedtime

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your individual needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see which of these patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new patterns until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, when you take insulin 4 times per day, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Here are 3 examples of blood sugar checking patterns that may work for you. Talk to your healthcare provider to see which pattern is right for you.

Pattern 1

When you are meeting your targets, check your blood sugar 4 times per day, before each meal and at bedtime in order to see how your previous insulin dose worked.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Starting to take insulin 4 times per day, or are meeting blood sugar targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
       
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 4 times per day        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

If you are not meeting your targets, check your blood sugar 8 times a day until you meet your targets. Work with a member of your healthcare team to support you so that you meet your targets.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
If you are not meeting your blood sugar targets, and need more blood sugar readings to learn what changes will help you meet your targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
       
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 8 times per day
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you typically take rapid/regular with NPH/long acting at breakfast and dinner

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your individual needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see which of these patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new patterns until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least equal to the number of insulin doses.

  Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
When you take insulin before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you
take insulin
           
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 4 times per day        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you are on an insulin pump

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your individual needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see which of these 3 patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new patterns until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least as often as you take insulin. For example, when you take insulin 4 times per day, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Here are 3 examples of blood sugar checking patterns that may work for you. Talk to your healthcare provider to see which pattern is right for you.

Pattern 1

When you are meeting your targets, check your blood sugar 4 times per day, before each meal and at bedtime in order to see how your previous insulin dose worked.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
Starting to take insulin 4 times per day, or are meeting blood sugar targets before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you take insulin          
    Continuous rapid-acting insulin throughout the day
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 4 times per day        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

If you are not meeting your targets, check your blood sugar 8 times a day until you meet your targets. Work with a member of your healthcare team to support you so that you meet your targets.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
If you are not meeting your blood sugar targets, and need more blood sugar readings to learn what changes will help you meet your targets. before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
 
When you take insulin          
    Continuous rapid-acting insulin throughout the day
 
A suggested blood sugar checking pattern: 8 times per day
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the past 6 months or you are not meeting glycemic targets

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if one of these 4 patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the past 6 months, check your blood sugar at least once per day, and, at different times of the day to learn the effects of the food you eat, exercise and/or medications on your blood sugar.

Pattern 1

This pattern for checking your blood sugar is helpful when you are first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday              
Monday              
Tuesday              
Wednesday              
Thursday              
Friday              
Saturday              
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

This pattern for checking your blood sugar is helpful when you are first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, to learn the effects of the food you eat.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday                
Monday            
Tuesday                
Wednesday            
Thursday                
Friday            
Saturday                
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 3

This pattern for checking your blood sugar is helpful when you are first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to learn the effects of exercise. Sometimes, improvements in blood sugar can be seen 4 -8 hours later, so alternate the times you check your blood sugar after exercising.

3 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday    

EXERCISE
     
Monday                
Tuesday                
Wednesday                
Thursday        

EXERCISE
 
Friday                
Saturday                
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 4

This pattern for checking your blood sugar is helpful to learn about your blood sugar levels during a typical day.

4 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday                
Monday                
Tuesday  
Wednesday                
Thursday                
Friday                
Saturday                
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you have type 2 diabetes, take medication by mouth and/or follow a healthy lifestyle to control your blood sugar, and are meeting blood sugar targets.

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if this pattern is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar 1 to 2 times per week. If you take a medication that is known to cause low blood sugar, check also when you suspect your blood sugar is low, or when it has occurred.

Medications and Risk of Low Blood Sugar
Medications with a lower risk of low blood sugar Medications with a higher risk of low blood sugar
  • Metformin
  • Acarbose
  • Pioglitazone, rosiglitazone
  • Saxagliptin, sitagliptin
  • Liraglutide, exenatide
  • Gliclazide, glimepiride
  • Glyburide
  • Nateglinide, repaglinide
  • Chlorpropamide, tolbutamide
  Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday                
Monday              
Tuesday                
Wednesday                
Thursday              
Friday                
Saturday                
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you have type 2 diabetes, and are sick or starting a steroid medication.

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if one of these three patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least twice per day.

Pattern 1

Check your blood sugar at least twice per day, to help you make food, exercise and/or medication changes, until your blood sugar targets are met. If you take a medication that is known to cause low blood sugar, check also when you suspect your blood sugar is low, or when it has occurred.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday            
Monday            
Tuesday            
Wednesday            
Thursday            
Friday            
Saturday            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

Check your blood sugar at least twice per day, to help you make food, exercise and/or medication changes, until your blood sugar targets are met. If you take a medication that is known to cause low blood sugar, check also when you suspect your blood sugar is low, or when it has occurred.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday            
Monday            
Tuesday            
Wednesday            
Thursday            
Friday            
Saturday            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 3

Check your blood sugar at least twice per day, to help you make food, exercise and/or medication changes, until your blood sugar targets are met. If you take a medication that is known to cause low blood sugar, check also when you suspect your blood sugar is low, or when it has occurred.

3 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday            
Monday            
Tuesday            
Wednesday            
Thursday            
Friday            
Saturday            
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

If you have gestational diabetes.

This tool can help you learn about a blood sugar checking pattern that is right for your own needs. Talk to a member of your diabetes healthcare team to see if one of these 2 patterns is right for you. Do not change your current pattern to any new pattern until you speak with your healthcare provider.

Check your blood sugar at least 4 times per day.

Pattern 1

Check your blood sugar at least 4 times per day.

1 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday        
Monday        
Tuesday        
Wednesday        
Thursday        
Friday        
Saturday        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

Pattern 2

Check your blood sugar at least 4 times per day.

2 Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bedtime Night
  before after before after before after   2:00 - 3:00 am
Sunday        
Monday        
Tuesday        
Wednesday        
Thursday        
Friday        
Saturday        
Write down your blood sugar readings on this log page or, download and view them on your computer. Look for patterns. Review with someone on your healthcare team.
  Are any of these blood sugar numbers above or below your target range? If any are low or high, consider what the cause may be.
 
↓ Lows (also called hypoglycemia) may be caused by:
   →   More physical activity than usual
   →   Not eating on time or skipping a meal
   →   Eating less carbohydrates than you should have
   →    The effects of diabetes medications, including insulin
   →   The effects of drinking alcohol
 
If the blood sugar number is lower than 4 mmol/L – take action!
 
  1. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams)
  2. Wait 10 to 15 minutes
  3. Check your blood sugar again. If it is still low treat again with a fast-acting carbohydrate
  4. Read this resource to learn more about hypoglycemia.

↑ Highs may be caused when:
     →   Food, activity, and medications are not balanced
   →   You are sick
   →   You are under stress
   →   You are not taking the right amount of insulin
 
If a pattern of lows or highs continues, talk to someone on your healthcare team about the need to increase or decrease the insulin you take.

YOUR suggested blood sugar pattern(s):Download PDF

ALL blood sugar patterns:Download PDF

This is only to be used as a decision support tool and is subject to these terms.
For more information, please see the disclaimer.